Thursday, April 25, 2013

Who is this Faber character anyway?


As Montag continues his exploration of books, he seeks out Professor Faber. Enter mentor #2. Superficially, Faber appears the complete opposite of Beatty--books are necessary--at least the good ones. But dig a little deeper, there are quite a few ways he is similar to Beatty.

Re-read sections of "The Sand and the Sieve" and explore how Professor Faber compares to Captain Beatty, and then discuss the impact Faber has on Montag.

22 comments:

  1. The main difference seen between beatty and Faber is their beliefs on books. Beatty thinks that books have no place in the world, and they have no meaning or help in anyway. His response makes sense since he is a fireman. Faber on the other hand loves everything books. A while back he was actually a literature professor at a university. Sadly he was fired from the job when people stopped going to universities and stopped reading. Faber truelly understands books and thinks of them as good for the world because they help think and look into the unknown.
    Faber has the bigger impact on Montag than beatty did. Faber got montag farther into the want for books to bebrought back. In the second section, he gives montag a brief introduction of what it means to be a reader and how everything in books can be deceived. This gets to Montag because it makes him want to know and understand books better. With this, Montag then asks Faber to be his mentor in the understanding of books.

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  2. In the section the Sand and the Seive Faber is a person that Montag takes refuge in and looks to mentor. They bond over books very well when Montag says that he might have the last copy of the bible out there. Faber becomes easily connected to Montag due to the correlation of curiosity in the both of them. On the outside Faber seems like a direct opposite of Beatty due to the fact that he thinks books are vital and a necessity. Beatty how ever does not. He thinks that they need to abolished due to the fact that they instigate not conformity which leads to unhapiness. Looking deeper into this section Faber and Beatty have more alike than what meets the eye. The similarities that they both posess is a strong passion for their cause. Beatty believes solely that books are the root of unhapiness unlike Faber who believes books and nonconformity are the root of happiness, even though they both differ in opinion they both are similar in the fact of how strongly they are moved by their cause. Another similarity is the fact that they both are a mentor figure to Montag. Again, in different aspects Faber tells that books are good and Beatty tells him that they are not like he is battling the iconic picture of the devil on one shoulder and an angel on another. They both are very influential to Montag it seems like a catch 22 because both of their opinions mean a lot to Montag but they differ so greatly. Faber has great impact on Montag. Montag was looking for one eprson to back him up on his plan and when Faber joined it seemed like it gave Montag new wings to try to put his plan into action. With out Faber supporting him, al though he was apprehensive he gave Montag hope that his curiosity was worth fighting for.

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  3. During this section Guy is introduced to Professor Faber and Faber becomes more of a role model, or advisor, to Guy throughout this section. Professor Faber is like Captain Beatty because he is well versed in what books are about. When the Captain talked to Guy he quoted books and he discussed books as if he himself was an avid reader. Likewise, Faber was once one of the highest respected people because he was a professor but since the books have been outlawed he has lost his high standings. Faber is eager to share his knowledge with Guy, but he is hesitant at first. He is like the Capain in this part of the story as well because he is willingly talking to Guy about books and in the earlier chapters the Captain did this as well. Although, Faber is trying to convince Guy that books are informational and useful, meanwhile, Captain Beatty is trying to deter him from reading the books. Faber has a strong impact on Guy. I think that before Guy goes into town to meet Faber he is starting to doubt the validity of books but once he talks to Faber he knows that he has to learn more. He helps Guy spy on the firehouse and he helps him run from the poilice. Faber has had a strong impact on Guy, although I'm not sure exactly if it is going to end up being a good or bad impact in the end.

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  4. In many ways, Faber and Beatty are fairly similar. Although their overall all opinions of books may differ, the drivitive of their opinions manifested from the same seed. Beatty said that he may be interested in books if they were actually unique and worth reading anymore. He said they are all repeats of the same informaiton that will not step on the toes of others. This is the same feeling of Faber. He misses the old books. He wants the old type of literature and wanted people to be impowered by the opinions and not offended beyond repair. The books that are in the world now are practically useless and are full of meaningless comedy. Also they are both similar because they really did no good in the situation of the books. They both reconginized that maybe the old books were better but Beatty continued to be a firefighter and get rid of the books while Faber stayed locked in his house for years. They are also similar in the fact that they are both using Montag for their own advantage. Beatty uses him in the fire department to help get rid of books and Faber is trying to have him on a secret mission to attack firemen from the inside.
    Faber does have a large impact on Montag. Montag seeks Faber because he wants someone to listen to him and really understand why the books are important. Faber is this person for Montag. However, Faber is not quite the ideal person Montag wants to confide in. Faber keeps holding Montag back from talking to other people and letting out his feelings. This may be the best idea in reality, yet Montag feels restricted by his new 'guardian angel' at times.

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  5. Superficially speaking, Faber and Beatty are seemingly polar opposites in their claims and ideas about books. However, looking deeper into the two, there are a few key similarities they both share. Both Beatty and Faber are trying to be a teacher and persaude Montag. Beatty believes in the burning of books while Faber believes they are useful and should be brought back. They both both also teaching Montag valuable lessons. Montag is learning the usefulness of books and literature and how to refute arguments from Beatty. Faber is teaching Montag the true value of books and nonconformity. Thus, Faber's impact on Montag is indeed life changing. Not only is Montag trying to read books and learn more from them, he is also loosening the reins of the government and becoming a noncomformist. He is starting to question things and think for himself and uses his continuing knowledge from the books he's reading to better help himself and hopefully others. Faber ultimately brought back the actual meaning of the word "life" to Montag and through this Montag will finally be able to be at peace and truly happy.

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  6. Although Beatty and Faber greatly differ in their opinion of books, they both have similar things to say. Beatty and Faber are both trying to influence Montag, and they both have strong arguments and opinions on this subject. They both point out that no books are original, they all are based on the same story lines and no one could ever write a new story. Both of the man are also very well read and have credentials so that Montag knows that they know what they're talking about. Both of them frequently quote books and give example from literature. Both of the men have extensively studying books and our language to come to a conclusion on the importance of books and what they mean in society, but they just come to different conclusions.

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  7. Even though Beatty and Faber are greatly different between what they stand for in the book, they both have great similarities in what they have to say and what knowledge they show. Both characters show a great wealth of knowledge about books, which makes me believe that they both (including beatty) have experienced their own good times with books and have probably read many of them. Both of the characters agreed with the argument that theyre are no new "original" books anymore, with each book coming across with the same story line as the previous one. The only difference is that Faber wants to get back to the old "original" books, while Beatty says books are pointless, but may be interested in them if they were more unique and orginal.I feel as if Montag is using Faber as a way to explore his emotions about books, as a replacement for Beatty, since it would be socially unacceptable to confide his love for books to the captain of his fire department. Faber has more of a keeping quiet impact on Montag as to not share his love for books, to keep him safe from the fire department. Although, Montag does not see this as much as a blessing, but more of a curse since he wants to express his feelings very greatly to the world about the good in books.

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  8. Beatty and Faber, are very different on the surface, but underneath it all, they are very similar when it comes to Montag. They both very happily, help Montag through his decision to read books. Although, they help him in different ways, they push him to read anyway. Both of these people, in a way mentor Montag in his decision to read books. He gets his information from the both of them as well. They both tell him what he needs to know about books, and what books are best to read. They both almost have him breaking the law, but in a very secretive way.
    Faber, I think, really helps Montag. He allows him to read and interpret everything going on in the books. Montag uses him as a mentor almost, to guide him while reading and almost not be judged because he's reading. However, Faber somewhat gets him started in breaking the law in more ways than just reading, and I think that can quickly change who Montag is, and who he can rely on.

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  9. Montag knows relatively nothing about books so he goes to these two to learn more. Beatty gives his a brief history and why books are bad. Montag doesn't want to believe him ,but pretty much begs Faber to teach him. One mentor is willing to provide information while the other is reluctant. Montag wants to believe Faber and wants to reject Beatty. They are both very persuasive and well versed in literature. Their key differences are their willingness to help Montag and Montag's willingness to listen.

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  10. Faber is similar to Beatty in the sense that Montag looks to him for wisdom. Before Montag decided to dive his curiosity into books, he looked to Beatty for most of his knowledge and information. Both Faber and Beatty have read books and this is what draws Montag in. he is so curious about books, which is probably why he looks to Beatty, since he knows he has read, and later Faber since he has not only read, but is very experienced in literature. Now, as Beatty's true intentions are revealed Montag must look to Faber, who is quite the opposite in opinions of Beatty, for help. To Montag, Faber is his new refuge. Montag has begun to doubt or question whether books are truly worth the fight. After talking to Faber, thought, his mind is made up, and that is the biggest impact Faber had on him. He made Montag realize that there are more than just a few people out there looking for the freedom of books again. It was almost like Faber gave him the last push he needed to go through with his ambitions. Faber is the new mentor Montag needed when Montag changed his mind about his opinion on books.

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  11. Beatty and Faber are just two of the three mentors Guy Montag encounters throughout the events of Fahrenheit 451. Beatty and Faber both have entirely different philosophies on their ends, but they are actually slightly closer than they appear. Faber, preaches his own philosophy to Guy, the book burning situation is not just about the books. The books being burned reflect life, there's a much deeper meaning to what's going on. Beatty meanwhile on the other end also goes on to tell Guy it's not just about the books and the controversy they create, but about keeping people happy and free of problems and exclusions that could upset them. Another place where they are similar is their strong feelings on their opinions, they both are strong believers in what they are saying. The two are also similar in their intellect and the fact that they are both very knowledgeable; Beatty having read and been taught the history of books and burning them, Faber being a former professor of English and knowing the books very well. Both are also very adamant about sharing this knowledge they have with Guy in order to inform him. They also see faults in different systems; Faber sees fault in the burning and firemen situation while Beatty sees faults in the books themselves. However both have yet to take full charge of the situation; Beatty has done more to rectify the situation as he sees fit by burning the books and being a fireman, while Faber is very reluctant to carry out his plans with Guy (he of course later gives in.) In conclusion, when it comes to their causes, Faber and Beatty are very strong-willed and see a deeper meaning but share very different opinions.

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  12. In the present setting of the book, both Faber and Beatty are voicing different views. Beatty finds books to be useless and a hinderance in the world which is why as a fireman he seeks to get rid of them. Faber on the other hand, thinks books still hold much value in society, more specifically the older ones than the new ones. He believes the originality of books are nearly invisible in the newer ones. They are more comedic than teaching a lesson. The similarity between the two lies not within the present setting but their background. Both before books were "illegal" loved reading books to see their meaning and the information that they had to share. Then another difference comes in that Beatty conformed to the way of ignoring books while Faber didn't and took the illegal route in hiding his possession of books and his actions of reading them. They both use Montag for their own gain. Beatty wants Montag to conform also and get rid of books, but Faber doesn't want Montag to conform and use him as a tool to get rid of the "fireman" and his burning of books. Both mentors use rhetorical strategies to persuade Montag to their side of the battle of books. Both try to persuade Montag to their side rather than letting Montag make the decision for himself. However, it seems to be that Faber has the bigger persuasion on Montag. Montag chooses Faber as his main mentor because he believes Faber can bring him closer to the answers and understandings he is seeking for about books. I'm sure that Faber used to be a literature professor also helped his credibility in knowing what he is talking about when it came to Montag's decision of following and listening to what Faber had to say. Montag believes Faber will lead him down the right path of information concerning books.

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  13. Both Beatty and Faber are fairly well learned in terms of reading and understanding books. Faber taught English at a university until it closed due to a lack of students, and Beatty delved into books through his curiousity. In addition to being learned, both men acted as mentors to Montag. Beatty knew Montag much longer and was, understandably, Montag's first mentor that we know of. The two worked together for fairly long time. When Montag became interested in books and free thought, Beatty was there to encourage him to get it out of his system and get back to work. Montag found that he wanted more from books, so he thought back to a chance meeting with an old professor in a park. This was, of course, Faber, and he found his home to speak with him. Faber told him that books were wonderful and could change the world, provided the circumstances were right. This was the opposite of Beatty, who expressed to Montag the theory that books were despicable and should be destroyed. Montag was interested in the advice both men had to offer. However, after realizing Beatty's hatred of books and their entailments, Montag leaned toward Faber. Faber's free, but cautious, thought awoke something in Montag that had been smoldering for days. Montag was so influenced by Faber that he decided that he would fight for books and free thought. Faber obviously changed Montag's indecisive mind for the better. (Sorry for the rambling.)

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  14. With both mentor’s strong opinions being poles apart on the matter of books, each of the men have similar characteristics. First and foremost, each mentor is using their own power of persuasion to try and make Montag see their side of the argument. Through these arguments it is easy to see just how educated both men are. Beatty spits out numerous quoted attributed to different authors while Faber has more of a quiet knowledge that he slowly reveals to Montag.

    Faber ends up having a great impact on Montag. He makes Montag start to believe that with the books they can change the way things are. Through Faber Montag finds hope and what some might consider meaning for his life. Faber pushes Montag to further his relationship with the books and to ignore what others might argue against them. This will ultimately have a profound effect on Montag.

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  15. Captain Beatty and Professor Faber both share an intense passion for books and reading; however, on opposite ends of the spectrum. Faber loves books while Beatty believes books cause opposition in the world. Both men have mentored Montag along the way, who is losing faith in the society and the role he plays as a fireman. Each of these influential characters are trying to win over Montag’s belief system, philosophy, and practice. Beatty has an interesting method of persuading Montag because he has the insight and knowledge of books and the communal effects based on his own past experimentation. This gives him reason to be stubborn in his beliefs. Beatty believes that fire and destruction is the solution to all troubles; if controversy arises, burn it. Society is seen to be too complicated to ruffle the feathers of conformity. Beatty’s position is fear-based and puts forth avoidance as a strategy for dissuading controversy or negativity. Faber teaches Montag that it is not just the books that are important, but the meaning behind them as well. Faber, a wise and elderly professor, has been able to see the transformation in people come full-circle. He experience has shown that the absence of books has caused regression rather than progression within the population. Faber has far more credibility due to his years of life-experience and long-term perspective. He has seen the impact across generations and has the ability to make comparative analyses of the current system. Faber appealed to Montag’s sense of curiosity. He now has Montag thinking about the value of thinking.

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  16. Faber is similar to Beatty because of how Montag looks to him for wisdom. Montag looked to Beatty for the majority of his knowledge before he made the decision to use books. Montag is curious about books before both Faber and Beatty have read books before. Therefore, since he knows that Beatty has read books before that is why he looks to Beatty. Since Beatty's true intentions were shown, Montag not must look to Faber. Faber made Montag see that there are more than just a few people out there looking for the freedom of books again. Faber became a mentor for Montage when Montag had began to change his opinion about books.

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  17. Although Beatty and Faber seem to have opposite intentions and personalities, they both share a few similarities. Both of them seem to be trying to convince Montag of something. For example, Faber believes that books are a necessity for everyone in the world. He finds that they contain valuable information, and that people need time to read and digest the information. On the other hand, Beatty is trying to convince Montag that books are detrimental to the world. He supports his theory by lecturing to Montag that books create conflict and that they contradict one another. He also argues that books became unoriginal. Faber and Beatty, although possessing polar opposite views, both were trying to convince Montag of what each of them believed to be true. Beatty and Faber's arguments are simlar in the way in which they attempt to convey their messages. They both use logos to try to convince Montag. Undoubtedly, both men are very educated and seem to give reliable information. Although both men seem to have polar opposite views, the way in which they convey and present their information is very similar.

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  18. Faber and Beatty at first seem to be complete opposites. Faber is living for a chance to read, while Beatty's main goal is to wipe all the books from the world. However, when one looks deeper on the subject it becomes apparent that the two men actually have some things in common. First of all, they both have a relationship with Montag. Faber is using him to try to get the dirt on the firemen and bring back books once and for all, while Beatty uses him for quite the opposite, to burn all chances of books returning. Another way that they are similar is that they are both looked to as “wise men”. Montag looks at Beatty as knowing exactly why we shouldn't have books, while he turns to Faber for advice as to why we need them. This “wisdom” that both the men exhibit comes from the common source that they both at one point probably read books and enjoyed them, otherwise Beatty wouldn't probably remember as much as he does. Finally, they are the same in that they are both highly devoted to a cause. Beatty's cause is to wipe out books, while Faber's is to bring them back and they are both dead set on seeing them through.
    Faber definitely has a major impact on Montag. Montag realizes that he has no control over his life or what happens in it. After realizing this, he becomes afraid and looks for an explanation and help. Faber becomes just this. Faber helps Montag sort through his thoughts and is his rock in a time where things are not exactly adding up for Montag. Faber turns Montag's ideas into realities as he helps him do what he dreams in making steps towards bringing the books back.

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  19. Both men are similar in their knolwedge of books. While beatty uses this knowlege to make an argument against books as he believes they a negative effect on society. Faber however sees books as a benefit to society and that they can have some valuable information on certain subjects. However both Faber and Beatty agree that more modern books don't say anything that useful and Faber thinks a book is only useful when it contains meaningful content. In this sense he would be ok with outlets like tv if they had anything meaningful on them. They are also using Montang to their own benifit. Beatty wants Montag to help him burn book while Faber wants Montag to get rid of firemen. Faber has had a large impact on Montag. He taught him why books were useful in the the first place and why it was worth reading. He has also put Montag on the path he is on now. With out Faber Montag would not know what he should do to make things better and he likely would have given in to becoming a fireman again.

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  20. Faber and Beatty have polar opposite views when it comes to book. Despite this fact, they are similar in the way that they are both trying to persuade Montag in to thinking they way that they do. Faber is very passionate about books and reading, while Beatty things books cause great problems. These men both offer valid points about their views and they give Montag detailed reasoning as to why they believe the way that they do. These men may have completely different standpoints when it comes to books, they are still both helping him to understand what he believes and teaching him to be passionate about whatever that may be.
    Faber has a great impact on Montag because Montag has never really heard of someone who reads book and honestly enjoys them. Beatty has read books before, but he thinks that they cause conflict. Faber opens Montag's eyes to the possibility that books are helpful and they can teach new information. Montag has never seen this view point before and he becomes very interested in what Faber has to teach him.

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  21. Faber and Beatty have very different personalities, as seen by their mentoring of Guy Montag. When Beatty mentored Guy, Beatty went on a spree of logical assumptions from vague facts of history to persuade him that books are bad with very little emotional appeal. Faber persuades Guy by envoking his curriousity of books with his free thinking and potential of knowledge that he describes books to have. Even though Faber and Beatty have different views they seem to just want whats best for the world and books are the key to making it better or worse.

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  22. Both Farber and Beatty are similar in some ways even though their opinions in the subject are different. For example; both of them use the power they possess to try and persuade Montag into believing their side of the argument. In the arguments they make it is easy to say that both of these men are very educated. They both use this knowledge they have in different ways, but in the end, there arguments are trying to do the same thing, which is to bring Montag on their side.

    Faber ends up having a great impact on Montag.Montag begins to believe that maybe books can change the way things have been for so long. Farber helps Montag find hope. Montag takes Farber's advice and further strengthens his relationship with books and puts a great effect on Montag. .

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